Nov 9, 2011

Come for a Walk in My Garden after the Rain

Pouring, drenching, life-giving "can it get any wetter" rain yesterday.
And this morning, the garden said thank you.
Come for a walk with me to see the freshness.
I let most plants in the veggie garden go to flower + seed
so that Rumba (the lorrikeet) can eat some & 
I can arrange the rest as flowers for the house.
This is Rainbow Chard ~ an everyday staple for dinner.
Baby apples just forming from the blossom we had a few weeks ago.
Usually the possums get them just when they are perfectly ripe.
How do they know???
My husband's ancient & recently discovered Wollemi Pine.
He is very proud that it is growing so well.
In about a hundred years it may have reached 3 metres...
Elderflowers. I love this dark colour of the leaves 
against the pale pink flowers.
David Austin roses ~ magnificent this year.
And the scent??? Oh, sublime! The intensity of a bottle of rosewater.
Acanthus flowering by the front door.
The pond is for any frogs who may be hopping by. 
Well, you never know. There may be a prince amongst them....
Young heirloom tomato plants grow on driftwood stakes.
 There were so many more photos that I took because the garden 
was so beautiful after such a deluge of nitrogen-rich rain,
so these are just a few of them.

And what of the forecast now?
More drenching rain today - so I will have a very happy garden tomorrow!

all images: blue fruit, taken in my garden this morning

19 comments:

  1. Your garden is so beautiful. I loved looking at the pics. Thanks for this post!
    x KL

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  2. Annie Loveridge9/11/11 12:30 PM

    I've had a busy morning and that 'walk through your garden' has made me feel like I've slowed down - thank you! It is so beautiful, all of it. Now I know what I have at the bottom of our garden - Acanthus! I am absolutely fascinated by them but had no idea what they were called. I saw so many lovely plants I remember from our garden when I was growing up - lovely pics as always thank you. Annie x.

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  3. Hello Annie. Acanthus are the most striking plants aren't they? They are also known as "Bear's Breeches" because of the prickles. And "Oyster Plants". One of those show-stopping dramatic plants which are sadly out of fashion, but  I don't understand why because they are so easy to grow yet so stunningly dark green and architectural in shape. Perhaps because they are old fashioned? Delighted you enjoyed your "walk"! V xx

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  4. you have a spectacular garden Virginia, loved all your beautiful images xo

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  5. Rachel Callaghan9/11/11 1:11 PM

    Oh how I wish we were neighbours - the plants we could swap! I would love a piece of your unbelievably dark iris, and I'd like to pick some of your elderberries to make cordial, so we could add this to our bubbles as we sit on the deck enjoying the evening sun!!! I'll just have to enjoy the pictures for now!!! Rx

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  6. Hello Claudia and thank you for the lovely compliments - very humbling. I just pop everything in the ground here and it just takes off all by itself! V xx

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  7. Hi Rachel. Hmmm...could I send you a piece of the iris root I wonder? What is the story with quarantine to NZ from Australia? It is an amazing colour. The darkest I have ever seen. My mother went to see the Garden Vineyard (on the Mornington Peninsula) and got chatting to the owner, telling her about my own garden. She promptly dug up a piece of root and gave it to my mother to give to me. Unbelievable generosity of gardeners. Her garden is featured in Monty Don's "Around the World in 80 Gardens" book. So I am a bit chuffed to have a little piece of this wonderful plant. 
    The elderberry plant is the new(ish) variety of Sambucus Black Lace. Oooh, it's one gorgeous little fellow. Only in it's second year, but I love it. Supposed to be deciduous but it forgot to read the instruction label. 

    And yes please to sitting on your deck with glasses of bubbles and elderberry cordial! I will treasure that idea! Vxx

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  8. Georgica Pond9/11/11 7:14 PM

    So verdant and bountiful - your roses are magnificent.

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  9. Jane and Lance Hattatt9/11/11 7:49 PM

    Hello Virginia:
    How well your garden looks, especially after the refreshing rain. The towering spikes of the white Foxgloves are wonderful and, we are sure, are absolutely magnificent in the evening light. They are a favourite of ours. David Austin Roses are so pretty, we love the way that they combine old-fashioned blowsiness with modern day healthy growth. Yours are so beautiful!

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  10. OH Virginia - I want to live in your garden - so lush and fresh and beautiful :) Make me look outside on bare trees, golden leaves on the floor, and grey skies - beautiful somehow - the decay, but it doesn't beat the flowers!! :O)
    Have a great day 
    Axx

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  11. Your garden is just beautiful Virginia ... mine is all but depleted  ... awaiting the frost and possible snow again. Most plants and trees have all but lost their leaves and going into hibernation. Thank you for the wonderful stroll! Enjoy your week.
    xx

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  12. Virginia, your garden is perfect. The roses are gorgeous and the daisies are so lovely.
    I have a problem with ants, they carry everything, or almost everything, specially flowers.
    I don't give up on my garden, but the ants are tireless, they don't give up too.
    Now, your garden is the perfect spot to sit and thank for the simple fact of seeing so much beauty.
    Warm hugs from Brasil.

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  13. Hi Mel. I love that word "verdant". One of the loveliest words in the dictionary! V xx

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  14. Hi Jane and Lance. Loving the foxgloves - such an easy care plant - a favourite of mine too. They just merrily pop up year after year, without any fuss. And yes, in the early twilight they are beyond compare in their lofty white splendour. David Austin roses do so well in Australia that even the man himself was shocked at how voluminously they grow here, compared with their country of origin. He described them as almost a weed in Australia. Tongue firmly in cheek. Never in my book shall they be perceived as a weed! V xx

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  15. Hello Anya. I wish I could bottle up some of the pretty flowers to send to you then! I love the beautiful decay of autumn too - but most of all I love the changing of the seasons. V xx

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  16. Glad you went for a stroll in your imagination and enjoyed it Marina. Sending you warmth from down under to spread amongst the freshly chilled air! V xx

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  17. Why thank you Tereza! How frustrating. They say ants appear where the aphids are, and that aphids appear when a plant is not strong. So round and round it goes! There are parts of my garden that have ants - although this is slowly decreasing as I am building up the soil with more compost and the ants seem to disappear. So I know how hard it can be! V xx

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  18. Virginia, I love your garden! All the flowers are so gorgeous especially those roses. The first picture is perfection, in my opinion. You did a great job taking care of the garden!

    www.mixandchic.com

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