May 25, 2011

If a Rose by any other name would Smell as Sweet, how about Pigface?

Sometimes I wonder if the name of a plant
has quite a bit to do with it's popularity.
Like the Pigface plant, 
shown flowering here in my garden.
Of course, Shakespeare was onto this 
in his famous quote.
The unfortunately named Pigface
or Carpobrotus Glaucescens
(not much better)
is in fact an absolutely fabulous groundcover.
 It's a seldom~planted edible Australian native, 
with the most wonderfully juicy succulent leaves.
My grandfather used to pick it for salads,
while warning us we might turn into pigs if we ate it.
{He was a wag!}
So despite it's odd little name
I was keen to plant it in my garden,
because it is a tough little cookie,
surviving on scant water and happy to live 
on rocky faces.
But I just had to show you this glorious garden, 
inspired by the impossibly bright colours of Pigface.
It's by Eckersley Garden Architecture.
Do you see the lovely plant cascading 
down the grey planter box?
That is the beautiful Pigface.
When it errupts into flower, 
the colour will match the floor. 
Imagine
The designer, Myles Broad, 
has used this ancient plant as a springboard
for a wonderfully inspired colour scheme of purples,
glaucous blue~greens and greys.
It is a rambling garden,
my personal favourite kind,
where the visitor is allowed to wander
and find shady spots.
Another Australian native, Liriope
is repeated throughout the garden.
The purple flowers are colourful exclamation points.
"Hello!" they seem to say.
Can you imagine a Sunday lunch 
on this terrace?
Oh yes please, it will be lovely.
Climbing Morning Flags 
positively jump against the rich purple walls.
It's a garden where the garden designer owner
has had some fun with bold colours.
And it just makes me ponder, 
if this gorgeous plant had a prettier name, 
would we see it a little more often?

1/2/3/4 blue fruit garden
All other images & Coastal Cottage garden 

13 comments:

  1. You make an excellent point!!

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  2. Well you know how I feel about name calling at the moment (!!) but ...
    Pig-Face oh Pig-Face
    come live in my home
    Amongst the trees & the shrubs
    and even a garden gnome.

    I'll love you & water you
    Till your pink flowers shine
    I'll watch you & care for you
    and tell all that you're mine


    (note: I'm no shakespear .. but a valiant effort)

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  3. I know one thing, I'll never forget that beautiful plant's name thats for sure! So perhaps that is the upper hand, bc next time I'll look for flowers I'll look for the pigface!

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  4. WOW, what a beautiful post and well written. In BTW, you have a very inspiring posts with interesting contents. Keep it up!

    Cheers! =(^.^)=

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  5. Linda you are so clever! Love, love, love your poem!

    Rhonya, thank you! What a lovely comment to read!

    Tamra, I'm glad you find it beautiful too.

    One Crafty Fox ~ thank you! It's food for thought, isn't it?

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  6. Ahhh, I love when I visit :) This little piggy wants more! The name doesn't phase me one bit. You do have a great point to ponder though...while getting lost in your lovely garden images. Bacon anyone? :) XO, Kelly

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  7. I loved reading this post you are indeed very clever Linda! I also love that gorgeous garden by Myles Broad, beautiful inspiration! Have a wonderful day, Sasha xx

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  8. your post gave me a sense of de ja vu..it is only yesterday that i was wondering why anyone gave rhododendron the name that sounds like a cross between a dragon and a rhino..but since it is a very popular flower we have gotten used to the name..and now pigface..that really is an unfortunate name for such a pretty flower..xx meenal

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  9. This has made me take a furtive glance in the direction of the concrete patio.. dare I?

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  10. I think that fuchia floor is spectacular! and the plant is much prettier than it's name...

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  11. love your blog!
    take care,
    Rosa

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  12. It is indeed an unfortunate, and I think, unfair name. I wonder how it came by it? You make a great point though. And that garden above is gorgeous. I'm so inspired by that fuchsia concrete floor!

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  13. Glad that I didn't miss this one even though I am late to it. Yes, we always need to think twice before slapping an easy label on something, shouldn't we? Yes!

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